What We Learned in May - The Digital Marketing Month in a Minute

It can sometimes be hard to wrap your head around just how big a company Google is. Take our first story in this article; Google now handles at least two trillion searches per year. The search engine giant is also busy making changes to some of its most well-known features, including the ubiquitous SERPs and the Search Console. There’s also news from Twitter, Facebook and here at Distilled.

This month's biggest stories

Google now handles two trillion searches a year

In 1999, Google was handling one billion searches per year. That already huge figure is now dwarfed by Google’s own estimate of handling at least two trillion searches every year. The really interesting challenge for businesses and marketers is figuring out where the next trillion searches will come from. Our own CEO Will Critchlow discussed this in his recent SearchLove presentation.

Read the full story (Search Engine Land)


Twitter will exclude links and images from 140-character count

It has been speculated for some time, but Twitter has finally announced it will not count links and images in its famous 140-character limit in tweets. The change will also apply to user mentions at the beginning of tweets, while users will also be able to retweet their own tweets.

Read the full story (The Guardian)

Twitter will exclude images and links from its character count.


Google Home to take on Amazon Echo

In yet another move that proves Google is putting serious effort into personal assistants, it has announced a new product called Google Home. Home will take on Amazon Alexa in the in-home personal assistant arena. It was announced at the 2016 Google I/O, where a number of other new Google innovations were unveiled for the first time.

Read the full story (The Verge)


Facebook expands Audience Network reach beyond users

Facebook launched its Audience Network two years ago, and it has since been limited to the not-insignificant audience of Facebook Users. However, it has now expanded to all web users, even if they aren’t signed up to Facebook.

Read the full story (Marketing Land)


Google making wholesale changes to Search Console

Google has announced a swathe of changes to its Search Console. It is integrating more closely with Google Analytics, as well as adding the knowledge graph and rich snippets. There are also rumours of voice search coming to Search Console in the future.

Read the full story (Marketing Land)


The end of the blue links?

Google is not averse to making small or large-scale visual changes to the SERP results, but the most recent test is changing something we’re all accustomed to - the blue link. Google is currently testing black links, with speculation that the potential change is linked to CTR and ad revenue.

Read the full story (The Guardian)


The problem with Facebook and the News

Following on from a recent story suggesting Facebook suppressed conservative news articles, Stratechery digs into the repercussions of such an allegation, and what it means for Facebook’s future as a source of news and current events.

Read the full story (Stratechery)

Distilled news

With our new Optimisation Delivery Network (ODN) fully up and running, we’ve been running numerous experiments to improve the performance of both our own website and those of our clients. One of these, conducted by Consultant Tim Allen, looked at the impact of H1s and title tags, and provided concrete results. You can read the full breakdown here.

In other news, Tom Anthony and Will Critchlow appeared in another Moz Whiteboard Friday to discuss the ins and outs of App Search, while Consultant Sergey Stefoglo has created a detailed guide to optimising your WordPress blog posts.

Finally, Consultant Ore Oduwole has been exploring the future of digital marketing in an ad block-enabled world.

More news

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About the author
Andrew Tweddle

Andrew Tweddle

Andrew joined Distilled in March 2015 as a Junior Marketing Manager. His main responsibility is to get the word out about our great products and services, meaning he’s pretty much glued to TweetDeck and MailChimp. Away from his desk Andrew is a...   read more